PBS Show to Look at Nexus of Technology, Environment and Politics in Series

What life will be like in 10 or 15 years, and how politics will interact with ascendant technologies and the environment

We want to get a feel for what life will be like in 10 or 15 years, and how politics will interact with ascendant technologies and the environment.”

— Linda Gasparello, Co-Host and Creative Director, White House Chronicle

WASHINGTON, D.C., USA, May 30, 2017 /EINPresswire.com/ — Llewellyn King, executive producer and host of “White House Chronicle,” the weekly news and public affairs program on PBS, has announced a summer series of vital issues episodes.

In the series, “White House Chronicle” will examine the nexus between technology, politics and the environment, and how it will affect the future of ordinary Americans. The program will look at a number of critical areas, including the future of work, the future of electricity supply, the future of transportation, the future of housing, and the future of living in a warmer planet.

“Over the 20 years the program has been on air, we have emphasized what Anthony Trollope called 'The Way We Live Now,' ” King said. “This summer, we will be looking at the trends, the technologies and the politics which decide that.”

Already this year, “White House Chronicle” has looked at the future of work in a two-part series with Thomas Kochan, co-director of MIT's Institute for Work and Employment Research, and in an episode on the gig economy, featuring Kauffman Foundation Senior Fellow Diane Mulcahy.

The program has also looked at the future of oceans in a two-part series with Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.), and episodes with Mark Spalding, president of The Ocean Foundation, and Sunshine Menezes, director of the Metcalf Institute at the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography.

Kicking off its summer series, the program will look at the impact of technology on the electricity supply, filming on location at the Edison Electric Institute's annual convention in Boston on June 12-15.

Linda Gasparello, the program's co-host and creative director, said, “We want to get a feel for what life will be like in 10 or 15 years, and how politics will interact with ascendant technologies and the environment.

“We are hoping to hear from companies who feel their technologies will have an impact. We want to work with them, whether they are in the materials field or in game-changing technologies like 3D printing.

“We also want to hear from viewers and listeners on which political figures are important to the future quality of life, from the governance of the Internet to the rebuilding of the nation's infrastructure. Tell us and we will ask them,” she said.

Llewellyn King
White House Chronicle
(202) 441-2702
email us here


Source: EIN Presswire